PROTA4U
Record display
.PROTA4U Homepage

.Select translation pop-up:  

Dalbergia chapelieri Baill.

Protologue  
 Bull. Mens. Soc. Linn. Paris 1: 436 (1884).
 show more data (2)comments (0) 
 
Family  
 Papilionaceae (Leguminosae - Papilionoideae, Fabaceae)
 show more data (5)comments (0) 
 
Synonyms  
 Dalbergia pterocarpiflora Baker (1890).
 show more data (4)comments (0) 
 
Vernacular names  
 Hazovola à grandes feuilles (Fr).
 show more data (2)comments (0) 
 
Origin and geographic distribution  
 Dalbergia chapelieri is endemic to eastern Madagascar.
 show more data (4)comments (0) 
 
Uses  
 The wood is used for construction, carpentry and furniture. In the past, it has been used for railway sleepers. It is also used in traditional medicine to treat parasitic diseases including bilharzia, intestinal complaints including diarrhoea and dysentery, and to facilitate childbirth. The bark is sometimes collected and used for tanning hides and dyeing.
 show more data (0)comments (0) 
 
Production and international trade  
 The wood is traded in small amounts in local and international markets, often mixed with the wood of other Dalbergia spp.
 show more data (0)comments (0) 
 
Properties  
 The heartwood is red to purplish grey with darker streaks, distinctly demarcated from the reddish grey sapwood. The texture is medium. The wood is moderately heavy, slightly lighter in weight than the wood of Dalbergia baronii Baker, hard and elastic. Shrinkage during drying is moderate to high. The wood is suitable for sliced veneer. It is moderately durable.
The presence of flavonoids, tannins, triterpenes, steroids, coumarins and anthracenosides has been recorded for Dalbergia chapelieri.
 show more data (0)comments (0) 
 
Botany  
 Deciduous shrub or small to medium-sized tree up to 15(–18) m tall; bole up to 60 cm in diameter; outer bark thin, with lenticels, whitish to greyish, inner bark brownish; young branches glabrous. Leaves arranged spirally, imparipinnately compound with (7–)11–15(–19) leaflets; stipules small, caducous; petiole and rachis usually glabrous; petiolules 1.5–4 mm long; leaflets alternate, obovate to elliptical or oblong-elliptical, 2–6 cm × 1–3 cm, leathery, glabrous. Inflorescence a terminal or axillary panicle 5–10 cm long, short-hairy. Flowers bisexual, papilionaceous, 8–12 mm long; pedicel 1.5–4(–5) mm long; calyx campanulate, 6–9 mm long, reddish to purple, lobes longer than tube, upper lobes fused; corolla whitish, often reddish tinged, with broadly elliptical standard and clawed wings and keel; stamens 10, fused into a tube, but free in upper part; ovary superior, with distinct stipe at base, style slender, c. 2 mm long. Fruit a flat, elliptical to oblong pod 5–8(–13) cm × 1.5–3 cm, with stipe 3–5 mm long, glabrous, reddish brown, finely reticulately veined, indehiscent, 1–3-seeded.
Dalbergia chapelieri trees flower when they are leafless or forming new foliage, from August to April. Nitrogen-fixing root nodules have been reported for Dalbergia chapelieri; Bradyrhizobium and Mesorhizobium strains have been isolated from the root nodules.
Dalbergia is a large pantropical genus comprising about 250 species. Tropical Asia and tropical America have about 70 species each, continental Africa about 50 and Madagascar slightly over 40. In Madagascar many Dalbergia species produce high-quality wood.
Dalbergia pervillei Vatke from western Madagascar is very similar to Dalbergia chapelieri, but it can be distinguished by its usually short-hairy petiole and rachis and slightly smaller fruits. The wood of Dalbergia pervillei is also used for carpentry and furniture, and the reddish exudate is used in local medicine to treat laryngitis. Dalbergia pervillei is classified in the lower risk category in the IUCN Red list. Dalbergia tricolor Drake is related to Dalbergia pervillei; it is selectively felled for its timber, and its bark yields a black dye and its wood a red one. It is classified as vulnerable in the IUCN Red list. Dalbergia tsiandalana R.Vig. is another somewhat similar species from western Madagascar; it can be distinguished by its more numerous and smaller leaflets. Although it is a small and rare tree, it is reportedly selectively felled for its good-quality rosewood, although confusion with other species may be the basis of this statement. Dalbergia tsiandalana is classified as endangered in the IUCN Red list. Dalbergia glaberrima Bosser & R.Rabev. also resembles Dalbergia chapelieri, especially in its flowers, but differs in fewer leaflets per leaf and its inflorescence being a raceme. It is classified as vulnerable in the IUCN Red list. The wood of Dalbergia glaberrima is used in western Madagascar for construction and furniture.
 show more data (0)comments (0) 
 
Description  
 show more data (1)comments (0) 
 
Other botanical information  
 show more data (3)comments (0) 
 
Ecology  
 Dalbergia chapelieri occurs in evergreen humid forest, up to 1000 m altitude. It can be found in humid valleys as well as on drier crests, and even may survive as a shrub after resprouting in secondary vegetation.
 show more data (4)comments (0) 
 
Genetic resources and breeding  
 Although Dalbergia chapelieri is widespread in eastern Madagascar, from Maroantsetra in the north to Tôlañaro in the south, it occurs mainly in lowland forest, a habitat that is under much pressure because of growing human populations and the resulting demand for agricultural land. Moreover, Dalbergia chapelieri is locally selectively felled for its valued timber. It is included in the IUCN Red list as vulnerable.
 show more data (0)comments (0) 
 
Prospects  
 Very little information is available on Dalbergia chapelieri, and much research is still needed to judge its prospects. However, these do not seem bright because of the often small size of the tree and its declining numbers.
 show more data (0)comments (0) 
 
Major references  
 • Boiteau, P., Boiteau, M. & Allorge-Boiteau, L., 1999. Dictionnaire des noms malgaches de végétaux. 4 Volumes + Index des noms scientifiques avec leurs équivalents malgaches. Editions Alzieu, Grenoble, France.
• du Puy, D.J., Labat, J.N., Rabevohitra, R., Villiers, J.-F., Bosser, J. & Moat, J., 2002. The Leguminosae of Madagascar. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Richmond, United Kingdom. 750 pp.
• Guéneau, P., Bedel, J. & Thiel, J., 1970–1975. Bois et essences malgaches. Centre Technique Forestier Tropical, Nogent-sur-Marne, France. 150 pp.
• Rasoanirina, G.J., 2002. Contribution à l’étude du genre Dalbergia. Les différentes espèces et leurs repartitions géographiques à Madagascar. Usages thérapeutiques, constituants chimiques et effets anti-parasitaires de Dalbergia chapelieri. Mémoire de CAPEN (Certificat d’aptitude pédagogique de l’école normale), Filière Physique Chimie, Ecole Normale Supérieure, Université de Fianarantsoa, Madagascar. 44 pp.
• Razafindrasoa, V., 2003. Etude botanique de Dalbergia chapelieri, Dalbergia lovelii, Dalbergia maritime, Dalbergia normandii. Mémoire de CAPEN (Certificat d’aptitude pédagogique de l’école normale), Filière Physique Chimie, Ecole Normale Supérieure, Université de Fianarantsoa, Madagascar. 66 pp.
 show more data (5)comments (0) 
 
Other references  
 • du Puy, D., 1998. Dalbergia chapelieri. In: IUCN. 2006 Red list of threatened species. [Internet] http://www.iucnredlist.org. Accessed December 2006.
• Rasolomampianina, R., Bailly, X., Fetiarison, R., Rabevohitra, R., Béna, G., Ramaroson, L., Raherimandimby, M., Moulin, L., de Lajudie, P., Dreyfus, B. & Avarre, J .-C., 2005. Nitrogen fixing nodules from rose wood legume trees (Dalbergia spp.) endemic to Madagascar host seven different genera belonging to α- and β-proteobacteria. Molecular Ecology 14(13): 4135–4146.
 show more data (1)comments (0) 
 
Afriref references  
 show more data (3)comments (0) 
 
Author(s)  
 
R.H.M.J. Lemmens
PROTA Network Office Europe, Wageningen University, P.O. Box 341, 6700 AH Wageningen, Netherlands


Editors  
 
D. Louppe
CIRAD, Département Environnements et Sociétés, Cirad es-dir, Campus international de Baillarguet, TA C-DIR / B (Bât. C, Bur. 113), 34398 Montpellier Cedex 5, France
A.A. Oteng-Amoako
Forestry Research Institute of Ghana (FORIG), University P.O. Box 63, KNUST, Kumasi, Ghana
M. Brink
PROTA Network Office Europe, Wageningen University, P.O. Box 341, 6700 AH Wageningen, Netherlands
General editors  
 
R.H.M.J. Lemmens
PROTA Network Office Europe, Wageningen University, P.O. Box 341, 6700 AH Wageningen, Netherlands
L.P.A. Oyen
PROTA Network Office Europe, Wageningen University, P.O. Box 341, 6700 AH Wageningen, Netherlands
J.R. Cobbinah
Forestry Research Institute of Ghana (FORIG), University P.O. Box 63, KNUST, Kumasi, Ghana
Correct citation of this article  
 Lemmens, R.H.M.J., 2007. Dalbergia chapelieri Baill. [Internet] Record from PROTA4U. Louppe, D., Oteng-Amoako, A.A. & Brink, M. (Editors). PROTA (Plant Resources of Tropical Africa / Ressources végétales de l’Afrique tropicale), Wageningen, Netherlands. <http://www.prota4u.org/search.asp>. Accessed .



Additional references  
Citation in books
 There are 4 book citations related to Dalbergia chapelieri Baill.. Click on "show more" to view them.
 show more datacomments (0) 
 
Citation in web searches
 There are 53 citation in web searches related to Dalbergia chapelieri Baill.. Click on "show more" to view them.
 show more datacomments (0) 
 
Citation in scholarly articles
 There are 5 citation in scholarly articles related to Dalbergia chapelieri Baill.. Click on "show more" to view them.
 show more datacomments (0) 
 
Citation in Afrirefs
 There are 13 citations in Afrirefs related to Dalbergia chapelieri Baill.. Click on "show more" to view them.
 show more datacomments (0) 
 
Citation in Wikipedia
 There are 5 Wikipedia citations related to Dalbergia chapelieri Baill.. Click on "show more" to view them.
 show more datacomments (0) 
 

Loading
General importance
Geographic coverage Africa
Geographic coverage World
Timber use
Medicinal use
Conservation status


show more thumbnails



Creative Commons License
All texts are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Netherlands License
This license does not include the illustrations (Maps,drawings,pictures); these remain all under copyright.